cèdre, bois anti-mites

What do the following have in common?

Your desks, wardrobes, doors and your children’s treehouses? (Well they can dream).

The answer? Wood.

Wood is an inconspicuous thing, it blends into the backround, never really being noticed; it exists as a part of your life but you never really give it a second thought (at least not beyond the odd splinter). So, we’re here to tell you about a specific type of wood. A very useful wood. Cedar Wood.

Juniperus virginiana (Eastern Red Cedar) isn’t the most generally used of the woods, so it’s not quite as well-known as mahogany or beech, but it does have some interesting properties. The main one being its ability to repel moths due to its aromatic nature.

There’s not much worse, is there? The realisation that your beautiful new sundress, or the trousers that fit just right (and in all the right places), that you keep safely tucked away aren’t quite as safe as you may have thought. That heart-sinking realisation that your trousers, sundress or summer skirt have been savagely attacked by moths since you last checked on them, forever ruined and never to be worn again.

There are a few ways to prevent this. Chests and wardrobes which are lined with cedar wood can be used to store your most precious garments, or, for a cheaper alternative, you can simply put blocks or balls of cedar wood in with your clothes as mighty protectors of the innocent.

The range of products you have to choose from is extensive; blocks that hang in your wardrobe, balls or shapes that sit in your drawers or even sachets that can be used almost anywhere.

So, cedar wood is quite useful, but that’s not all it’s used for; it’s also used as a Christmas tree in some places and the cones of the Juniperus virginiana (eastern red cedar) are used to flavour gin.

This is one wood you should know about, and now you do.

Watch our short video to see cedar in action.

 

 

 

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